Vocalabs Newsletter: Quality Times

Issue
107

Desire Paths in Journey Maps

In This Issue


Desire Paths in Journey Maps

It's tempting, in a journey mapping project, to skip the time-consuming and sometimes expensive process of asking customers what their actual experience was in completing a particular journey.

This is a mistake. We constantly discover that in the real world people behave differently than we expect. If your journey mapping process is only gathering data from company insiders, you're getting a skewed perspective. Insiders understand how the system works, and that makes it hard to see where a customer might find things confusing or illogical.

Even if you're gathering behavioral data, chances are you're missing important parts of the puzzle. The best web analytics in the world won't tell you why customers do certain things, they'll only tell you that real customers are behaving in ways you can't easily explain. And in the real world, lots of customer behavior won't be captured for a variety of reasons.

This is illustrated nicely by the idea of the Desire Path. A Desire Path is a trampled path that people create by the routes they actually follow, rather than the paths the designers expect them to use.

A desire path is what happens when people find their own way, rather than following the path that's been laid out for them.

Desire paths happen all the time in Customer Experience. Every time a customer hits "zero" instead of cooperating with the IVR menus, that's a desire path. Companies may try to corral customers into certain behaviors, but usually wind up opening desire paths in the face of unhappy, frustrated customers.

The goal of most journey mapping projects should be to document actual customer journeys, as opposed to the journeys you want or hope your customers to take (the want or hope part usually comes later). You are, in essence, documenting the desire paths your customers are following when they interact with you.

In the customer experience world we usually can't just look to see where the grass is trampled, so we have to ask customers where they actually went, why they chose that route, and how they felt about it.

Without customer feedback, your journey map will only show the sidewalks. 


Listening to Customers

Every company likes to say that it listens to customers. But when was the last time you literally listened to a customer?

I've learned over the years that listening to customers--through audio recordings of interviews or direct conversation with customers--is one of the most powerful tools for developing customer insights and empathy. Through our voices we communicate so much more than mere words: we communicate emotions, context, and subtle shadings of meaning.

If you've ever tried (and failed) to use sarcasm in an email, you know what I'm talking about.

I firmly believe that how you use recordings of customer interviews is a big factor in whether your customer feedback process actually drives change in your company or just sits on a shelf. From coaching front-line employees to advocating in front of executives, audio recordings are often the difference between inspiring change and arguing about statistics.

But I've found that many companies don't use this powerful tool, even when it's available. They think that listening to audio feedback will take too long, or bias their thinking. Or they assign low-level employees to listen to recordings, and senior decision-makers never hear them.

Here's three places you should be using the literal voice of your customers to drive change in your organization:

1. Persuading leadership to back changes

As part of your customer feedback, you've probably identified a few areas where investment is needed. It's important to make the business case, but many other initiatives will also have a strong payback (at least on paper).

I believe that in a customer-focused company customer-focused initiatives should have priority (all else being equal). Using a few audio snippets to illustrate the customer impact can help drive this point home. Of course you will want to make sure that your recommendations are backed by solid data and statistics.

It's hard to ignore when actual customers are telling you that you've got a problem. Illustrating your recommendations with selected recordings can help build a sense of urgency for taking action.

2. Gaining new insights

Recordings of customer interviews can help you understand customers' needs and opinions in a way that statistics and written feedback often don't. Audio lends itself to empathy and understanding.

Rather than listening to a large number of customer recordings (which can take a long time and not feel very productive), I generally use the statistical data to look for interesting trends and correlations. When I see something that makes me go, "hmmm," I'll select several recordings that seem to have a similar pattern and listen to them all to see what's really going on.

This method avoids a lot of the guesswork and assumptions that often happen when you try to interpret survey data. Often you discover that the customer is telling you exactly what you want to know, you just need to listen.

3. Coaching customer-facing employees

Interview recordings can help employees better understand what customers want and need. Customers are viewed as more credible sources of criticism and feedback than supervisors and coaches.

I recommend having the employee listen to the entire customer interview, and then ask the employee to interpret the interview through the lens of how their actions could have better served the customer or changed the customer's opinion of the interaction. In many cases, when the customer was completely satisfied, there's not much that could be done. But if the customer was not happy, often the employee will see the root cause and what could have been done differently to help or mitigate the problem.

It's important with this kind of coaching to remind the employee that each customer's feedback is just one person's opinion, and should be taken in the spirit of constructive criticism. Viewed in this light, often very negative or unfair feedback can lead to ideas for how to better handle a similar situation in the future.

The bottom line is this: If you are collecting audio customer feedback and not actively listening to it and using it to drive change, you are missing one of the most powerful tools in the Voice of the Customer toolkit.

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