The Customer Service Survey

Desire Paths in Journey Maps

by Peter Leppik on Fri, 2017-06-23 14:26

Desire Path
People often don't behave the way you expect them to. Customer feedback helps you uncover the disconnect between what you think customers do, and what they're really doing.

It's tempting, in a journey mapping project, to skip the time-consuming and sometimes expensive process of asking customers what their actual experience was in completing a particular journey.

This is a mistake. We constantly discover that in the real world people behave differently than we expect. If your journey mapping process is only gathering data from company insiders, you're almost guaranteed to get a skewed perspective. Insiders understand how the system works, and that makes it hard to see where an outsider customer might find things confusing or illogical.

Even if you're gathering behavioral data, chances are you're missing important parts of the puzzle. The best web analytics in the world won't tell you why customers do certain things, they'll only tell you that real customers are behaving in ways you can't easily explain. And in the real world, lots of customer behavior won't be captured for a variety of reasons.

This is illustrated nicely by the idea of the Desire Path. A Desire Path is one of those trampled paths that people create by the routes they actually follow, rather than the paths the designers expect them to use.

A desire path is what happens when people find their own way, rather than following the path that's been laid out for them.

Desire paths happen all the time in Customer Experience. Every time a customer hits "zero" instead of cooperating with the IVR menus, that's a desire path. Companies may try to corral customers into certain behaviors, but usually wind up opening desire paths in the face of unhappy, frustrated customers.

The goal of most journey mapping projects should be to document actual customer journeys, as opposed to the journeys you want or hope your customers to take (the want or hope part usually comes later). You are, in essence, documenting the desire paths your customers are following when they interact with you.

In the customer experience world we usually can't just look to see where the grass is trampled, so we have to ask customers where they actually went, why they chose that route, and how they felt about it.

Without customer feedback, your journey map will only show the sidewalks. 

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