The Customer Service Survey

You're Not Managing If You Only Measure

by Peter Leppik on Wed, 2016-03-02 14:46

"You can't manage what you don't measure" is the old business saw.

But measurement is only the first step. Once you have the data you need to put it into action.

A lot of customer feedback programs fail to go from measurement to management. They collect data and metrics but don't follow through with the actions needed to improve the customer experience.

The problem is that it's too easy to think that survey metrics are telling the whole story, and that improving them is the goal.

But neither of those statements are true. Survey metrics do not tell the whole story, they give a statistical aggregation of hundreds or thousands of unique customers each with their own experiences and problems. And improving survey scores should never be the goal, but rather an expected side-effect of the true goal of making thousands (or millions) of individual customers have better opinions about the company.

Using survey data creates a dilemma: on the one hand it's necessary to boil down the data into a handful of numbers in order to make sense of the thousands of individual customers' opinions and get a high level view of how you're performing. On the other hand, those statistical measurements also hide the individual customers' experiences and opinions, making it hard to understand what the numbers actually mean.

The solution is to being individual customers back into the management part of the equation. Survey scores are always going to be necessary to track progress, but when it comes to actually making changes you should focus on individual customers.

That means using feedback from individual customers (especially the open-ended parts of the survey) for coaching and training, spending time reading (or listening to) survey comments when looking at process changes or improvements, and making individual customers' stories (not statistics) the core of survey reporting.

So while it's true that you can't manage what you don't measure, you also have to be careful not to let the measurement get in the way of the management.

Sorry...This form is closed to new submissions.