The Customer Service Survey

Two Views of Your Company

by Peter Leppik on Wed, 2017-04-19 15:11

Perspective matters.

One of the reasons we do customer feedback is because customers have a different view of a company than the company has of itself. Getting that outside perspective is important not only because you want to please your customers. It's also often the case that customers see inside the company's own internal blind spots.

It's common for companies to have lots of internal moving parts that have some friction between them. This is especially true when the company has been around a long time, or has grown through multiple acquisitions. There can be very complicated multilayered processes to help all the pieces work together, and when thing go well all of this should be invisible to the customer.

But the more complicated the processes and organization, the more likely it will be that there will be gaps. That's where getting the outside view can be extremely helpful.

Because chances are if you have gaps in your processes, there's customers falling into it. They may not understand what exactly is going wrong, but they will definitely notice that they aren't getting the level of service they expect. Maybe calls aren't being returned, or paperwork is getting lost, or customers are getting incorrect invoices. But whatever the situation, the customers know that their expectations aren't being met.

Chances are that any process issues like this are relatively rare, because if they were common they would have been noticed and fixed.

(If problems like this are common, then you might have a completely different set of issues like systemic mismanagement or even fraud. Wells Fargo probably had lots of customer complaints about fraudulent accounts, but senior leadership had a strong incentive to ignore them.)

Just because a problem is rare doesn't make it any less important to the customer who experiences it. And some of those process gaps can be very expensive in terms of added customer service cost, lost business, and even legal expenses if the situation is bad enough.

Fortunately, it's not hard to bring the customer's perspective into your organization to shine a spotlight on your blind spots:

  • Treat every customer complaint as though it might be the tip of a larger iceberg. Most of the time this won't be the case, but always ask yourself whether it could be.
  • Assume that for every customer who tells you about a bad experience, there are ten others who had a similar experience but stayed silent. This is going to be true more often than not, and will help put what may seem like isolated incidents into perspective.
  • Understand that your internal processes and metrics aren't giving you the whole picture. Gaps exist precisely because your internal view of the customer's experience isn't giving you the whole picture. Don't accept a "nothing went wrong" conclusion until you know exactly why the customer's view is different from yours.
  • And as a corollary, don't conclude that the customer is wrong or trying to cheat you until you've rules out every other reasonable explanation. There are some customers who will try to get something they don't deserve, but it's too easy to use that as an excuse for ignoring a bigger issue inside the company.

The key is to remember that there are two sides to every story, and two views of every company. Often we're blind to the problems inside our own organization, maybe because we've become habituated to them, or maybe because they don't seem as important as they should be. Getting the customer's view can help see gaps that live in your blind spots.

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