The Customer Service Survey

Troubleshooting a Survey: What Can Go Wrong

by Peter Leppik on Tue, 2014-11-11 16:28

A lot of things have to happen to build an effective customer feedback program.

The flip side of this that if you have a customer feedback program which isn't effective, there's a lot of potential reasons. Using a systematic approach to troubleshooting the feedback process can help avoid wasting time on implementing the wrong solutions.

So to help with an ineffective survey process, here's a short troubleshooting guide for common survey problems.

Problem: Low Survey Response

General Troubleshooting Questions:

  • Are you are getting accurate contact information for customers?
  • Does the survey work (no errors, database problems, etc.)?
  • Is the survey a reasonable length (one page with no scrolling for online surveys, five minutes or less for phone interviews)?
  • Does the survey appear to come from a legitimate source?
  • Are you ensuring that customers don't get over-surveyed?
  • Can the customer take the survey immediately when asked, or does the customer need to remember to do it at a later time?
  • Does the survey require the customer to go through extra steps (copy a code from a receipt, call a phone number, etc.)?
  • Does the survey have mandatory questions?
  • Is the customer asked to take the survey a long time (days or even weeks) after the transaction?

Troubleshooting Questions for Email/Online Surveys:

  • Are survey invitations being marked as spam?
  • Does the invitation look professional and legitimate?
  • Does the invitation explain why you want the customer's feedback?
  • Does the invitation promise that the survey will be short (note: the survey must actually be short)?

Troubleshooting Questions for Phone Interviews:

  • Do the phone interviewers sound polite, empathetic, and professional on the phone?
  • Do the phone interviewers have noticeable foreign accents?
  • Is the Caller ID set to a real phone number which customers can call back to verify the survey is legitimate?
  • Does the interview script give an honest estimate of the survey time?
  • Do interviewers identify themselves and the sponsor of the survey?

Problem: No Follow-Through With Customers

Troubleshooting Questions:

  • Do you have a closed-loop process for customers who may want or need extra attention?
  • Is there tracking to ensure customers who need follow-up are actually contacted?
  • Are follow-up calls conducted by someone empowered to solve the customer's problem?
  • Do you capture and track the root causes of customers' issues?
  • Are follow-up calls conducted by someone other than the person who may have caused the customer's problem?

Problem: Survey Responses Are Not Relevant to the Business

Troubleshooting Questions:

  • Has the survey been updated recently?
  • Have you reviewed the performance of each survey question, and removed questions which are not yielding useful information?
  • Have you experimented with new survey questions relevant to current business issues?
  • Are you asking follow-up questions when customers have negative feedback?
  • Do you ask business stakeholders to provide feedback on what questions are relevant to them?
  • Do you regularly update the survey as the business needs evolve?
  • Do front-line employees have access to raw customer feedback in real time?

Problem: The Business Does Not Fix Known Problems in the Customer Experience

  • Is there a leadership commitment to improve the customer experience?
  • Do other parts of the organization get data to show how they impact the customer experience?
  • Are you using individual customer stories to persuade the organization that these issues are important?
  • Is the customer survey perceived as credible?
  • Does the company culture encourage listening to customer feedback?
  • Can you connect poor customer experience to financial metrics (through churn, increased operational expense, higher customer acquisition cost, etc.)?

Problem: Too Much Survey Data and Not Enough Useful Information

  • Have you reviewed the performance of each survey question and removed questions which are not yielding useful information?
  • Are you giving customer-facing employees direct and real-time access to their customer feedback?
  • Are you asking follow-up questions when the customer gives negative feedback?
  • Do you have a reporting tool which allows easy filtering of customer feedback?
  • Are you tracking general categories of customer comments in free response questions?
  • Do your categories evolve as the business needs change?
  • Do you keep the number of categories manageable, so you don't have categories which are either irrelevant to the business or statistically insignificant?

Problem: Survey Reports Are Ignored

  • Is there a leadership commitment to improve the customer experience?
  • Does the company have a culture of listening to customer feedback?
  • Are survey reports tailored to the needs of the individual recipient, or does everyone get the same reports?
  • Can recipients of survey reports modify the reports (filter the data, calculate new metrics, read customer comments, etc.)?
  • Have you asked for feedback on survey reports from the people who receive them?
  • Do recipients of reports feel they have a stake in the customer feedback process?

These questions get to a lot of common underlying problems we see with customer feedback processes. This doesn't cover everything that can go wrong, but it's a good place to start if you don't think you're getting the results you should.

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